valleyofthemystics:

betweenunseen:

sunworldstories:

by Chiara Bautista

We are absolutely in love!

amazng

wow! it’s perfect

(via face-down-asgard-up)

detailsdetales:

Portrait of a Young Woman of Frankfurt, detail (c. 1480-1485)

Sandro Botticelli

(via killerville)

gastrogirl:

summer crostinis.

Tags: food

(Source: m-as-tu-vu, via kayla-bird)

(Source: thugbishie, via kayla-bird)

Tags: self care

canidcompendium:

Short-eared dog? Uncovering the secrets of one of the Amazon’s most mysterious mammals
by Jeremy Hance 
Fifteen years ago, scientists knew next to nothing about one of the Amazon’s most mysterious residents: the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis). Although the species was first described in 1883 and is considered the sole representative of the Atelocynus genus, biologists spent over a century largely in the dark about an animal that seemed almost a myth. But all this changed when veterinarian and researcher, Renata Leite Pitman, embarked on a long-term study of these enigmatic carnivores, even having the good fortune of being guided by a semi-wild short-eared dog named Oso. "My first thought when I heard about this ghost-like animal was that people must have been mistaking it for a similar-looking species, like a tayra or a jaguarundi," Leite Pitman told mongabay.com. "So I looked into the literature on the short-eared dog and found it was full of contradictions. One book had it occurring in this region, the other didn’t. One said the species was diurnal, and the other nocturnal. This mismatching information made me very curious," In fact, here was a good-sized mammal—a carnivore nonetheless—that was totally unheard of outside the Amazon and even little-known by locals there. 
Read more

canidcompendium:

Short-eared dog? Uncovering the secrets of one of the Amazon’s most mysterious mammals

by Jeremy Hance 

Fifteen years ago, scientists knew next to nothing about one of the Amazon’s most mysterious residents: the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis). Although the species was first described in 1883 and is considered the sole representative of the Atelocynus genus, biologists spent over a century largely in the dark about an animal that seemed almost a myth. But all this changed when veterinarian and researcher, Renata Leite Pitman, embarked on a long-term study of these enigmatic carnivores, even having the good fortune of being guided by a semi-wild short-eared dog named Oso. 

"My first thought when I heard about this ghost-like animal was that people must have been mistaking it for a similar-looking species, like a tayra or a jaguarundi," Leite Pitman told mongabay.com. "So I looked into the literature on the short-eared dog and found it was full of contradictions. One book had it occurring in this region, the other didn’t. One said the species was diurnal, and the other nocturnal. This mismatching information made me very curious," 

In fact, here was a good-sized mammal—a carnivore nonetheless—that was totally unheard of outside the Amazon and even little-known by locals there. 

Read more

(via starfoozle)

libutron:

Sargassum Sea | ©John Meszaros
From the artist:
[Patches of floating Sargassum algae provide a haven for thousands of organisms, far more than can be captured in one illustration. Though I have tried to show a reasonable sampling.
In addition to the juvenile loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) this picture also features: a Sargassum anglerfish (Histrio his trio), a Sargassum pipefish (Syngnathus pelagic us), A Planehead filefish (Stephanolepis hispidus), a juvenile Sargassum triggerfish (Xanthichthys ringers), a Sargassum crab (Portunus sati), five Sargassum sea slugs (Scyllaea pelagic), two Sargassum shrimp, two Sargassum sea spiders, several Sargassum feather hydroids, and numerous Tube-dwelling worms (the little white coils on the leaves.]

libutron:

Sargassum Sea | ©John Meszaros

From the artist:

[Patches of floating Sargassum algae provide a haven for thousands of organisms, far more than can be captured in one illustration. Though I have tried to show a reasonable sampling.

In addition to the juvenile loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) this picture also features: a Sargassum anglerfish (Histrio his trio), a Sargassum pipefish (Syngnathus pelagic us), A Planehead filefish (Stephanolepis hispidus), a juvenile Sargassum triggerfish (Xanthichthys ringers), a Sargassum crab (Portunus sati), five Sargassum sea slugs (Scyllaea pelagic), two Sargassum shrimp, two Sargassum sea spiders, several Sargassum feather hydroids, and numerous Tube-dwelling worms (the little white coils on the leaves.]

(via scientificillustration)

Tags: animals chroma

Hearst Castle

(Source: ahsah, via after-the-ellipsis)